My photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg are now online.  A few comments about the collection:

  • I guess I shouldn't be surprised, but I think my photos from the second day in Saint Petersburg are better style/quality than the first.  The difference - first day, I was with a guide, while second, I was on my own.  A tradeoff of having the whole experience vs. prioritizing photography.
  • If you have been following my travels for a while, you might notice that there is a bit more effort this time to capture people and street life.  It seemed important for this trip, knowing that at least at the moment, few of those who will see my photos will have had the same experience first-hand.
  • Naturally, several of the photos have stories to tell.  In some cases, I've told the essence of the story in the photo's caption. Here are a few more (oops, forgot one the first time):
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) It appears that even the portable toilets in Moscow have caretakers.  Jason wondered whether these are formal jobs or whether it is more like a squatter -- "these are my toilets, and you'll pay me to use them".  No idea, of course.  Had a similar experience looking for parking near the Pulkovo Airlines office in Moscow -- my colleague Igor negotiated with a man on the street to move a couple of orange cones that were blocking a space, and 30 roubles later, we had a place to park.
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) My guide politely called buildings like this "functional style".  To me, they are the stereotypical Soviet-era construction.  It is what an American expects to see everywhere.  The good news is, neither Moscow nor Saint Petersburg suffers an abundance of this style.
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) While Peter the Great was building Saint Petersburg, he lived in a small log cabin.  It has been preserved, but smartly has been enclosed inside this concrete/brick building.  Apparently, it has also had multiple uses -- was even a small church at one point.
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) Yes, this really is a monument to something.  Very strange.
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) This one is one of my favorites from the whole bunch.  On Sunday in Saint Petersburg, a lot of men were out in uniform, typically in groups.
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) One thing conspicuously absent in the Russian Orthodox churches -- pews.  Everybody stands.
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) This room in the Herimtage is a copy based on a frescoed room at the Vatican in Rome.  The Russian artists travelled to Italy, painted a copy on canvas, rolled it all up and hung the canvas in the Hermitage.
    Image:Photos from Moscow and Saint Petersburg now online (slight update) Local knowledge doesn't help -- While travelling, I always try to adopt as much to the custom and process of my surroundings.  In this case, the sign says, in Russian, "cashier".  So, dutifully, I followed the sign to go buy my ticket to enter St. Isaak's.  However, once I made it there and to the front of the queue, I was told "foreigner ticket over there".  And sure enough, there is a separate ticket office near the main cathedral entrance.  Perhaps they staff that separate office with someone who speaks multiple languages, or perhaps it is to throw a veil over the fact that many Russian sights have different admission fees for foreigners than for citizens.

You can also review my photos from my previous trip to Moscow, found on my old photos site.

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